ABOUT HAPKIDO

 Hapkido seeks to be a fully comprehensive fighting style and as such tries to avoid narrow specialization in any particular type of technique or range of fighting. 

It maintains a wide range of tactics for striking, standing joint locks, throwing techniques (both pure and joint manipulating throws) and pinning techniques. 

 

 Some styles also incorporate tactics for ground fighting although these tactics generally tend to be focused upon escaping and regaining footing  or controlling, striking, and finishing a downed opponent, rather than lengthy wrestling or submission grappling engagements.

Proper hapkido tactics include using footwork and a series of kicks and hand strikes to bridge the distance with an opponent. 

 

Then to immediately control the balance of the opponent (typically by manipulating the head and neck), for a take down or to isolate a wrist or arm and apply a joint twisting throw, depending upon the situation.

 

 Hapkido is a comprehensive system and once the opponent's balance has been taken, there are a myriad of techniques to disable and subdue the opponent.

Hapkido makes use of pressure points known in Korean as hyeol (혈; 穴) which are also used in traditional Asian medical practices such as acupuncture point.

These pressure points are either struck to produce unconsciousness or manipulated to create pain allowing one to more easily upset the balance of one's opponent prior to a throw or joint manipulation.

 

 Hapkido emphasizes self-defense over sport fighting and as such employs the use of weapons, including environmental weapons of opportunity, in addn to empty hand techniques.